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  • Seongdong OmijaCha Nov 25
    Korean
    If I don't know a person's age, how can I address him/her politely? "Ajumma" or "ajussi" don't sound proper to me...
    • Admin · Nov 25
      You may be right. Many Koreans usually use "저기요 (jeogiyo)" or "선생님 (seonsaengnim)". If you call someone "Ajumma" or "Ajussi", they might be upset because they don't want to be seen as old.
    • Admin · Nov 25
      You may be right. Many Koreans usually use "저기요 (jeogiyo)" or "선생님 (seonsaengnim)". If you call someone "Ajumma" or "Ajussi", they might be upset because they don't want to be seen as old.
  • Gangnam GarlicChicken Nov 23
    History/Culture
    I saw some street performances near Hongdae. Why do most Koreans sing well? Do they have different DNA or something?
    • Admin · Nov 23
      Koreans love to sing and dance. You can find "noraebang" (singing rooms) on nearly every city street. Our love of music is well rooted in history, as you can see from the mask dance and "samulnori" (traditional percussion performance) from ancient dynasties.
    • Admin · Nov 23
      Koreans love to sing and dance. You can find "noraebang" (singing rooms) on nearly every city street. Our love of music is well rooted in history, as you can see from the mask dance and "samulnori" (traditional percussion performance) from ancient dynasties.
  • Dongdaemun Sannakji Nov 19
    Invest/Business/Job
    What kind of platforms do Koreans use when looking for jobs?
    • Admin · Nov 19
      There are lots of different Korean job hunting platforms: JobKorea, SaramIn, Wanted, and Incruit, to name a few. But we also use LinkedIn!
    • Admin · Nov 19
      There are lots of different Korean job hunting platforms: JobKorea, SaramIn, Wanted, and Incruit, to name a few. But we also use LinkedIn!

Latest

  • Seongdong OmijaCha Nov 25
    Korean
    If I don't know a person's age, how can I address him/her politely? "Ajumma" or "ajussi" don't sound proper to me...
    • Admin · Nov 25
      You may be right. Many Koreans usually use "저기요 (jeogiyo)" or "선생님 (seonsaengnim)". If you call someone "Ajumma" or "Ajussi", they might be upset because they don't want to be seen as old.
    • Admin · Nov 25
      You may be right. Many Koreans usually use "저기요 (jeogiyo)" or "선생님 (seonsaengnim)". If you call someone "Ajumma" or "Ajussi", they might be upset because they don't want to be seen as old.
  • Gangnam GarlicChicken Nov 23
    History/Culture
    I saw some street performances near Hongdae. Why do most Koreans sing well? Do they have different DNA or something?
    • Admin · Nov 23
      Koreans love to sing and dance. You can find "noraebang" (singing rooms) on nearly every city street. Our love of music is well rooted in history, as you can see from the mask dance and "samulnori" (traditional percussion performance) from ancient dynasties.
    • Admin · Nov 23
      Koreans love to sing and dance. You can find "noraebang" (singing rooms) on nearly every city street. Our love of music is well rooted in history, as you can see from the mask dance and "samulnori" (traditional percussion performance) from ancient dynasties.
  • Jung Jjolmyeon Nov 19
    History/Culture
    I wonder why Korea has bad relationship with Japan? Is it related to history? My Korean friend said it’s complicated. Can you explain?
    • Admin · Nov 20
      South Koreans still want a proper apology from the Japanese government over the women forced into sexual slavery during World War II. There is also the issue of the Dokdo territorial dispute. Most South Koreans do not hate Japanese people, but it is true that they don't like the Japanese government very much. Therefore, Koreans have been boycotting Japanese Products.
    • Admin · Nov 20
      South Koreans still want a proper apology from the Japanese government over the women forced into sexual slavery during World War II. There is also the issue of the Dokdo territorial dispute. Most South Koreans do not hate Japanese people, but it is true that they don't like the Japanese government very much. Therefore, Koreans have been boycotting Japanese Products.
  • Dongdaemun Sannakji Nov 19
    Invest/Business/Job
    What kind of platforms do Koreans use when looking for jobs?
    • Admin · Nov 19
      There are lots of different Korean job hunting platforms: JobKorea, SaramIn, Wanted, and Incruit, to name a few. But we also use LinkedIn!
    • Admin · Nov 19
      There are lots of different Korean job hunting platforms: JobKorea, SaramIn, Wanted, and Incruit, to name a few. But we also use LinkedIn!
  • Jung Jjolmyeon Nov 16
    Life/Living
    Last night, I saw many teenagers waiting for their mothers on the street outside my apartment. Are they still studying at 11PM?
    • Admin · Nov 16
      Private academies ("hagwon") are dominant in Korean society. Many parents want to raise intelligent children, so they make them attend various extracurricular classes in piano, taekwondo, English, math, Korean, etc. In the '90s, kids were still engaging in outdoor play and physical activity, but not so much these days. They go to hagwon to get a leg up on high school education, which in turn helps them get good scores in the extremely difficult national university entrance exam ("suneung").
    • Admin · Nov 16
      Private academies ("hagwon") are dominant in Korean society. Many parents want to raise intelligent children, so they make them attend various extracurricular classes in piano, taekwondo, English, math, Korean, etc. In the '90s, kids were still engaging in outdoor play and physical activity, but not so much these days. They go to hagwon to get a leg up on high school education, which in turn helps them get good scores in the extremely difficult national university entrance exam ("suneung").
    • Jung Jjolmyeon · Nov 16
      Thank you ????
  • Nowon MaemilGuksu Nov 13
    Food/Travel
    When I eat lunch with my co-workers in Korea, I am always surprised at the wide range of side dishes served. How many side dishes do restaurants usually offer?
    • Admin · Nov 13
      In small eateries like a gimbap store, there will be at least two side dishes, like kimchi and yellow pickle. But if you go to a regular restaurant near an office building, more than 5 dishes will be served. Most of these are made of vegetables and fried with soy sauce, gochujang, or just salt / oil.
    • Admin · Nov 13
      In small eateries like a gimbap store, there will be at least two side dishes, like kimchi and yellow pickle. But if you go to a regular restaurant near an office building, more than 5 dishes will be served. Most of these are made of vegetables and fried with soy sauce, gochujang, or just salt / oil.
    • Nowon MaemilGuksu · Nov 13
      I saw 20 of dishes in one table!!! How come! Do they are free? Can I get more?
  • Dobong HobakJeon Nov 13
    Invest/Business/Job
    I'm just a normal person who just graduated high school. I want to explore South Korea for 6 months. I don't have any specific purpose in mind, but I would like to do interesting things. What kinds of activities or part-time jobs could you recommend for me?
    • Admin · Nov 13
      It depends on your visa type. Only D-2 and D-4 visa holders can take part-time jobs. Volunteer work is fine, but if you want a paid part-time job, you need permission from the Korean government in advance. For more details, check out the "Easylaw" website run by the Ministry of Government Legislation.
    • Admin · Nov 13
      It depends on your visa type. Only D-2 and D-4 visa holders can take part-time jobs. Volunteer work is fine, but if you want a paid part-time job, you need permission from the Korean government in advance. For more details, check out the "Easylaw" website run by the Ministry of Government Legislation.
  • Guro Beondegi Nov 12
    History/Culture
    The Korean delivery industry seems to run on superpowers. How does food arrive within 30 mins and how can shipping service be done in 1 or 2 day(s)? Do drivers sleep? Seriously?
    • Admin · Nov 12
      As per Korean cultural norms, everyone is always in a hurry. That's why delivery is so fast. However, fewer companies provide ultra-fast delivery services nowadays because so many employees have died from overwork. Morning delivery and 1-day delivery are not as common anymore, but pretty much anything can be delivered within 7 days.
    • Admin · Nov 12
      As per Korean cultural norms, everyone is always in a hurry. That's why delivery is so fast. However, fewer companies provide ultra-fast delivery services nowadays because so many employees have died from overwork. Morning delivery and 1-day delivery are not as common anymore, but pretty much anything can be delivered within 7 days.
  • Gangnam GarlicChicken Nov 12
    Life/Living
    Seoul is too crowded! I was shocked when I took the subway and bus in the morning. And I heard that most Koreans want to live in Seoul. Why?
    • Admin · Nov 12
      Unfortunately, urban development here is not balanced, just focused on Seoul. Because Seoul has nice infrastructure, the most jobs, and many restaurants, half of South Korea's population lives in Seoul and surrounding areas. People can't easily move to other regions because of their work and their children's education.
    • Admin · Nov 12
      Unfortunately, urban development here is not balanced, just focused on Seoul. Because Seoul has nice infrastructure, the most jobs, and many restaurants, half of South Korea's population lives in Seoul and surrounding areas. People can't easily move to other regions because of their work and their children's education.
    • Gangnam GarlicChicken · Nov 12
      Do they have any similar places like Seoul in Korea?
    • Dobong HobakJeon · Nov 13
      Busan , Gyeonggi-do, Incheon are quite similar places to Seoul
  • Dongdaemun Sannakji Nov 11
    Korean
    So I have this Korean friend. When I ask him something, he always says "I don't know (몰라), but maybe..." He always says he doesn't know but he knows everything, so weird????
    • Admin · Nov 11
      "몰라" is one of the most common casual expressions in Korean. Just like "아니 (literally 'No')", that phrase is used in that context similar to "You know what", "Basically", etc.
    • Admin · Nov 11
      "몰라" is one of the most common casual expressions in Korean. Just like "아니 (literally 'No')", that phrase is used in that context similar to "You know what", "Basically", etc.
  • Seongdong OmijaCha Nov 11
    History/Culture
    When I traveled to Seoul and other regions, I saw lots of memorials and museums for soldiers who lost their lives in the Korean War. Why did the Korean War break out? Why is Korea still divided?
    • Admin · Nov 11
      The biggest reason is the ideological difference between North Korea and South Korea. And their allies were different (Soviets for the North, Americans for the South). Strictly speaking, the Korean War hasn't ended yet and is still going on.
    • Admin · Nov 11
      The biggest reason is the ideological difference between North Korea and South Korea. And their allies were different (Soviets for the North, Americans for the South). Strictly speaking, the Korean War hasn't ended yet and is still going on.
  • Yangcheon Bossam Sep 16
    Korean
    I recently started studying Korean and I found out some words are different in K-dramas. I haven't heard about Jin.. (Something) when you say "have a dinner" to grandpa or grandma. How can I say it?
    • Admin · Sep 16
      Honorifics are words you use in Korean when you talk to people older than you or of higher rank. Some words should be changed to turn them into honorifics. For example, “밥 먹었어 (bap meogeosseo)?” can be changed as “식사 하셨어요 (siksa hasyeosseoyo)?” or "진지 잡수셨어요 (jinji japsusyeosseoyo)?”. As you can see, “-요 (yo)” is the most common honorific suffix. Even if 식사, 진지, and 밥 all have same meaning, they are all used differently.
    • Admin · Sep 16
      Honorifics are words you use in Korean when you talk to people older than you or of higher rank. Some words should be changed to turn them into honorifics. For example, “밥 먹었어 (bap meogeosseo)?” can be changed as “식사 하셨어요 (siksa hasyeosseoyo)?” or "진지 잡수셨어요 (jinji japsusyeosseoyo)?”. As you can see, “-요 (yo)” is the most common honorific suffix. Even if 식사, 진지, and 밥 all have same meaning, they are all used differently.
    • Yangcheon Bossam · Sep 16
      Then if I don't know about his or her age, what will be proper between “식사 하셨어요 (siksa hasyeosseoyo)?” or "진지 잡수셨어요 (jinji japsusyeosseoyo)?”.
    • Gangnam GarlicChicken · Sep 16
      I think in that case, “식사 하셨어요 (siksa hasyeosseoyo)?” is more proper. We can use this sentence in the business situation also.
  • Songpa Kimchijeon Sep 01
    Food/Travel
    Is it safe to travel to Korea during the pandemic?
    • Admin · Sep 02
      If you really want to visit, you will benefit from Korea's top-class health infrastructure. Hand sanitizer can be found anywhere, and all establishments record visitors via QR code. You will also be isolated for 2 weeks when you arrive. But we think the safest option is to just stay home and spend time with your adorable pets!
    • Admin · Sep 02
      If you really want to visit, you will benefit from Korea's top-class health infrastructure. Hand sanitizer can be found anywhere, and all establishments record visitors via QR code. You will also be isolated for 2 weeks when you arrive. But we think the safest option is to just stay home and spend time with your adorable pets!
    • Gangnam GarlicChicken · Sep 16
      Everywhere has hand sanitizer and almost 99% of Koreans wear a mask.
  • Songpa Ssambap Sep 01
    Korean
    I have one friend from Busan(or Pusan), he speaks a little bit different from my girlfriend who's from Seoul. Is there any website or tutoring program where I can learn Korean in the Busan dialect? I want to speak like a dude in a Korean gangster movie.
    • Admin · Sep 02
      The Busan dialect has a notably stronger intonation than Seoul's or anywhere else's. Getting that strong tone right is key to speaking like a stereotypical Korean gangster. A few words are also quite different to standard Korean. Go to YouTube and check out "The World of Dave", who has a video about different Korean dialects. You may also like the Korean drama "응답하라 1997 (Reply 1997)", which is set in Busan, so you can learn the authentic local sound.
    • Admin · Sep 02
      The Busan dialect has a notably stronger intonation than Seoul's or anywhere else's. Getting that strong tone right is key to speaking like a stereotypical Korean gangster. A few words are also quite different to standard Korean. Go to YouTube and check out "The World of Dave", who has a video about different Korean dialects. You may also like the Korean drama "응답하라 1997 (Reply 1997)", which is set in Busan, so you can learn the authentic local sound.
    • Gwanak Jokbal · Nov 10
      I think "쌈디" (Simon Dominic) has charming accents of Busan hehe
  • Guro Beondegi Aug 31
    Food/Travel
    Last time, When I saw videos regarding to Korean food, there are so many dishes were served! Do I have to pay extra tip to server?
    • Admin · Aug 31
      Korea has no tip culture. In fact, it is considered rude to tip, so don’t insist. All you need to pay for is your meal. Most of the side dishes come with "Free Refills". If you want to make it sure, please ask to waitress or waiter.
    • Admin · Aug 31
      Korea has no tip culture. In fact, it is considered rude to tip, so don’t insist. All you need to pay for is your meal. Most of the side dishes come with "Free Refills". If you want to make it sure, please ask to waitress or waiter.
  • Seongdong OmijaCha Aug 31
    History/Culture
    I saw many of videos that Koreans help Foreigners a lot. Is that real or fake?
    • Admin · Aug 31
      Most Koreans are friendly because of a cultural trait known as “jeong.” The best English translation is “compassion”, but it’s so much more than that. If you get lost, you’re sure to run into Koreans who will be glad to help you.
    • Admin · Aug 31
      Most Koreans are friendly because of a cultural trait known as “jeong.” The best English translation is “compassion”, but it’s so much more than that. If you get lost, you’re sure to run into Koreans who will be glad to help you.
    • Gwanak Jokbal · Nov 10
      I was lost in subway station, but I can find way thanks to Koreans hehe
  • Dobong HobakJeon Aug 31
    Life/Living
    I am solo traveler, and I would like to know how safe is South Korea. Is it safe to walk around at night also?
    • Admin · Aug 31
      South Korea is a very safe country. Even if you leave your personal belongings like a laptop or a cellphone unattended in a café, Koreans don’t care and won’t try to steal anything. There are many videos on YouTube that show this. But this isn’t the case 100% of the time, so don’t just leave your things anywhere. Also, watch out for drunk people in the streets at night!
    • Admin · Aug 31
      South Korea is a very safe country. Even if you leave your personal belongings like a laptop or a cellphone unattended in a café, Koreans don’t care and won’t try to steal anything. There are many videos on YouTube that show this. But this isn’t the case 100% of the time, so don’t just leave your things anywhere. Also, watch out for drunk people in the streets at night!
    • Gwanak Jokbal · Nov 10
      These days, there are lots of sexual crime in Korea also... so I think it would be better to not hang out till late...! And be careful of strangers on the street!
  • Seongdong OmijaCha Aug 27
    Invest/Business/Job
    After I went to Korea as exchange students, I decided to work in Korea for several years. I heard most of the jobs are closed because of the COVID virus. But normally what kind of work is open to foreigners?
    • Admin · Sep 02
      Normally, if you are from an English-speaking country, you can have a career as an English teacher. Because English is mandatory in school and gives one a huge boost for promotion at work, there are many private academies (hagwon) and classes that are open to both students and working adults. Or if you have a funny and outgoing personality, consider becoming a YouTuber or a broadcaster.
    • Admin · Sep 02
      Normally, if you are from an English-speaking country, you can have a career as an English teacher. Because English is mandatory in school and gives one a huge boost for promotion at work, there are many private academies (hagwon) and classes that are open to both students and working adults. Or if you have a funny and outgoing personality, consider becoming a YouTuber or a broadcaster.
    • Gangnam GarlicChicken · Sep 16
      English teacher is universal job, however, these days lots of Korean broadcasting company invite foreigners to new TV program. Or you can be a model of some cosmetics shop and shoot the viral marketing video :) I hope that you can find a good job in Korea :)
  • Gangnam GarlicChicken Aug 27
    Food/Travel
    I heard that there is some nice streets covered with cherry blossoms in Korea. Where is it? And when I can see them?
    • Admin · Aug 27
      In Seoul, the Han River is the best place to enjoy the cherry blossom festival during March to April, although it can get very crowded. If you plan to visit Gyeongsangnamdo (South Gyeongsang Province), you can join the large cherry blossom festival there from the last week of March to first week of April.
    • Admin · Aug 27
      In Seoul, the Han River is the best place to enjoy the cherry blossom festival during March to April, although it can get very crowded. If you plan to visit Gyeongsangnamdo (South Gyeongsang Province), you can join the large cherry blossom festival there from the last week of March to first week of April.
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